Headlines May 26, 2020

Headlines May 26, 2020

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    Headlines May 26, 2020 KGNU News

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Speaking this afternoon Governor Jared Polis thanked Coloradoans for staying close to home on Memorial Day and maintaining social distancing, noting that veterans have been particularly impacted by the coronavirus pandemic.

“It was a particularly difficult Memorial Day as a moment of reflection because a large portion of our veteran population here in Colorado falls into a high-risk category for COVID 19,” said Governor Polis.

A veteran died of COVID 19 yesterday at the Veteran Community Living Center, Fitzsimmons, in Aurora. The total number of veterans who have died of COVID 19 at the facility is now 15.

On Monday Governor Polis announced that restaurants could begin to offer in-house dining beginning tomorrow, under certain strict restrictions. These include limiting the number of diners to half the facility’s occupancy.

A maximum of 50 people will be allowed in restaurants and groups will be limited to a maximum of 8. Outdoor seating will be encouraged where possible. Bars that don’t serve food will not be allowed to reopen.

Some restaurants around the state have come under scrutiny for opening for in-house dining early and were made close under state public health orders.

A restaurant in Castle Rock was shut down by health officials after a video went viral showing crowds in the restaurant on Mothers’ Day.

Now the owners of C&C Breakfast & Korean Kitchen are suing Governor Polis and health officials over having its license suspended.

The lawsuit was filed Friday in Douglas County court and argues that the suspension of the restaurant license was unconstitutional and deprives them, “of their livelihood and ability to operate their business after they simply allowed customers onto their premises to serve food and beverages.”

CU Boulder today announced its roadmap for opening the campus for the fall semester. In an email to students, faculty and staff, Chancellor Phil De Stefano said that on-campus testing for COVID-19 would be available for students and faculty to both continuously monitor for potential spread and to test individuals with symptoms.

Masks will be required for all students and employees. In-person classes will take place through Wednesday, Nov. 25, and then remote teaching will happen after Thanksgiving to allow students to travel home and remain there until the spring semester begins.

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Colorado lawmakers return to the state capitol today for the first time since the legislature shut down in March due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The first order of business will be to pass a budget. The state’s new fiscal year begins July 1st and the upcoming budget will look very different from when lawmakers first began considering it before the pandemic.

The state is facing a $3.3 billion shortfall as a result of the economic impact of the pandemic.

As they resume work today, lawmakers will not be required to wear face masks, but many are expected to. All others entering the building will be required to wear face masks and all people entering the building will have their temperatures checked.

Social distancing will be observed in both chambers. Lawmakers in the House are expected to utilize the public gallery to allow for more spacing.

Lawmakers will also be considering some bills that would tackle air pollution.

Two measures that could move the state closer to protecting residents from air pollution will be considered. House Bill 1143 would increase the amount companies can be fined for unlawful emissions from the current maximum, $15,000, to just over $47,000 per day. H-B 1265 would require companies to alert surrounding communities in real time when they exceed pollution limits.

A new report by the Colorado Fiscal Institute examines the economic and health benefits of tackling health pollution in the state.

The report says that if pollutants were eliminated from a single oil refinery in Adams County, Colorado could see economic and health benefits worth between $15 and 35 million dollars each year. The report also highlights new Harvard research showing that people living in highly polluted areas, disproportionately people of color, also are more at risk of dying from COVID-19.

On Monday Governor Polis gave more details on further reopenings in the state. Summer camps for children will be allowed to reopen on June 1 with several restrictions including limits on the numbers of children allowed to participate. Overnight camps will have to wait until July to reopen.

Some restaurants will be able to have in house dining beginning on Wednesday.

Restaurants will have to follow several rules, including limiting the number to half the facility’s occupancy. A maximum of 50 people will be allowed in restaurants and groups will be limited to a maximum of 8. Outdoor seating will be encouraged where possible. Bars that don’t serve food will not be allowed to reopen.

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    Headlines May 26, 2020 KGNU News

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